Course Catalog

All ScholarConnect courses are currently hosted on the Canvas platform. Courses are purchased one semester at a time. Year-long courses are designated by Semester A and B. Semesters begin in August and January of each year.

Students who wish to participate in live classes with the rest of the student body should follow the recommended 4-year plan. Students of all grades move through their courses together as a cohort. To add a live mentored class to your student’s schedule, visit the Mentor Marketplace.

Students earn 0.5 High School credits per semester course upon completion with a passing (C- or better) grade. These transcript credits can be transferred to any other school upon request.

MyPace courses are more flexible and allow six months from enrollment for completion of all course material with no intermediate due dates.

Literature: Self-Governance

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Prerequisites: None


This course examines the themes of autonomy and self-control in literature from a Christian perspective, through the study of four classic works. Students will read and analyze The Great Divorce, Les Misérables, Man’s Search for Meaning, and The Screwtape Letters, with a focus on how the characters exercise their agency and self-discipline in light of biblical teachings. Through close examination and discussion, students will scrutinize the complexities of free agency and the challenges that come with self-control in the context of Christian teachings. Assignments will include critical analysis and personal reflection, with an emphasis on how the works studied can inform our understanding of biblical principles. By the end of the course, students will have gained a deeper appreciation of how these concepts relate to our personal spiritual growth as Christians.

Literature: Examining Conscience

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Prerequisites: None


There are few things more enjoyable than reading a good book! Students will experience this joy as they read and learn about the good literature featured in this course. The course will teach students to evaluate plots, themes, characters, settings, and literary approaches according to the standards of the gospel of Jesus Christ. Students will learn to read carefully, in order to discern the results of following or not following Godly principles and commandments. Instruction is given to help students to recognize the qualities of good writing, and to learn how to emulate those qualities in their own writing. The readings introduce themes of compassion, understanding, imagination, and refined judgment. This year we will read Julius Caesar, The Scarlet Letter, Beowulf, and Rip Van Winkle.

Literature: Moral Aptitude

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Prerequisites: None


There are few things more enjoyable than reading a good book! Students will experience this joy as they read and learn about the good literature featured in this course. The course will teach students to evaluate plots, themes, characters, settings, and literary approaches according to the standards of the gospel of Jesus Christ. Students will learn to read carefully, in order to discern the results of following or not following Godly principles and commandments. Instruction is given to help students to recognize the qualities of good writing, and to learn how to emulate those qualities in their own writing. The readings introduce themes of compassion, understanding, imagination, and refined judgment. This year we will read Henry V, Pride and Prejudice, To Kill a Mockingbird, Left to Tell, and a variety of poetry.

Literature: Reaching for Redemption

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Jeni Starley
     Dates: Aug 21 – Jan 12, Jan 15-May 16

Prerequisites: None


This course examines the theme of redemption in literature from a Christian perspective, through the study of four classic works. Students will read and analyze King Lear, The Mayor of Casterbridge, The Bronze Bow, and The Water is Wide, each exploring the complex nature of redemption. Through close reading and discussion, students will deepen their understanding of redemption as a theme and how Christian perspectives can shape our interpretation of literature. Assignments include critical analysis and personal reflection. By the end of the course, students will have a greater appreciation of how literature can inform and enrich our understanding of redemption.

Language Arts: Writing in Application

Middle School

Part A (1 Semester)

Part B (1 Semester)

Prerequisites: None


The course will focus on narrative, opinion, and persuasive writing in real-world applications. We will study how writing is used in FamilySearch, blogs, podcasts and Ted-style Talks.

Written Portfolio A: Effective Essays

High School

0.5 Credits

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Debbie Christensen
     Dates: Aug 21-Jan 12

Prerequisites: None


Students in this course will develop their thinking potential by solving complex analogy problems and improving their vocabulary. They will practice the skills of writing, learn several new types of writing, and incorporate important elements of style that will make writing a pleasure and reading it even better. They will study the basic structure of essays and practice writing them.

Written Portfolio B: Narrative’s Flow and Structure

High School

0.5 Credits

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Debbie Christensen
     Dates: Jan 15-May 16

Prerequisites: None

Students will come to experience writing as a relational activity: not one done in isolation, but a process which can be used to build the kinds of relationships they care about— with their friends, with their family, with future employers and college admissions, and even with their Father in Heaven.

Written Portfolio C: Persuasion with Style

High School

0.5 Credits

Prerequisites: None


Students will explore key thematic questions such as:  How can a writer argue more truthfully while respecting the reader’s liberty?  How can I be more persuasive?  How can I balance humility and confidence? Students will practice writing in a variety of genres and for a variety of purposes and readers—emails, argumentative essays, literary analysis essays, poetry, short stories, research papers, résumés, summaries, tributes, etc. They will experience writing as a process of revision and empathic anticipation, and they will become more sensitive to the elements of language which enhance communication—voice, word choice, sentence structure, organization, and conventions.

Written Portfolio D: Technical Tools

High School

0.5 Credits

Prerequisites: None


This course will help students along the path to becoming an excellent writer. Language is a gift from Heavenly Father given when his children were placed on the earth. Students in this course will develop their thinking potential by solving complex analogy problems and improving their vocabulary. They will practice the skills of writing, learn several new types of writing, and incorporate important elements of style that will make writing a pleasure and reading it even better.

Senior Thesis

High School

1.0 Credits

Prerequisites: None


This course is a prerequisite for graduation from American Heritage School. The purpose of this class is to give students an opportunity to exercise the 4-R (Research, Reason, Relate, and Record) methodology to produce and publish a culminating project. Students will research their own topic, then take the time to write, analyze, and edit their thoughts into a piece of writing worth keeping.

History: Ancient Rome, Christianity, and the Apostasy

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Prerequisites: None


In this course, students will learn of the Lord’s purposes for and hand in the events of “His” story. This course includes a study of the Roman Republic, the rise of the Roman Empire and the fall of Rome; Jewish history, holy days and celebrations, symbolism relating to the Savior, and Christ and the focal point of history. Students will then study the growth of the early church, focusing on the ministries of Peter and Paul, followed by a study of persecution of the ancient Christians, the apostasy, Constantine and the Council of Nicaea. Students will learn of bright lights that shone during dark ages, as demonstrated in the histories of Augustine, Caedmon, Alfred the Great, William the Conqueror, King John and Joan of Arc.

World History: Contemporary to Modern

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Heather Merrill
     Dates: Aug 21-Jan12, Jan 15-May 16

Prerequisites: None

Are you ready to geek out about World History like never before?  We will consider both the state of today’s world and the kingdom of God by asking how we got to where we are today.  We will do this by discussing which current events are of global significance. And here’s a catch; we are going to ask these questions by considering events chronologically backwards into world history!  We will start discussing our current times and work our way into previous time periods, people and events. Throughout this process, we will ask what our growing understanding of the web of historical causation requires of us as individuals, American citizens, and Christians. We will go back in time to study subsequent events from the present to the 1800’s.  We will see how restored priesthood keys set the stage for the great latter-day work of gathering Israel and building the kingdom of God on earth in preparation for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. Through our study of the Industrial Revolution, New Imperialism, the World Wars, the Cold War, and Globalism, we will consider how historical developments during the past two centuries have furthered the work of the Lord.

US History: The Founding Era

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Prerequisites: None

During this history course, students will see how God prepared the world for the Restoration of the gospel by preparing a land that provided a government of freedom, especially freedom of religion. They will study the events leading to the American Revolution and following the American Revolution to include the writing of the United States Constitution, the presidency of George Washington, and the War of 1812.

American Government and Economics

High School

0.5 Credits

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Heather Merrill
     Date: Aug 21 – Jan 12

Prerequisites: None


Students will study American Government by exploring both federal and state governments. After exploring different types of government, they will study the US Government, including its three branches, their responsibilities, and the election process. They will also study how state and local governments are organized and how those elections are held. Students will engage in role-play scenarios to explore what it’s like to make governmental decisions and what the consequences of those decisions might be.

Students will also study economics by way of the seven principles of economics and the leading ideas of sound economy, Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations, economic worldviews based on Secular Humanism, Marxist/Leninism, and Biblical Christianity. They will learn basic economic terms, including supply, demand, and scarcity. They will learn about property and our modern monetary system, including paper money. They will also discuss taxes and the roles of government in their collection and use. Students will also read, discuss, analyze and write about important essays on economics.

Students will come away from this class with an appreciation for American Government and Economics and the principles of truth found therein.

CONSTITUTIONAL STUDIES AND ECONOMICS

High School

0.5 credit

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Heather Merrill
     Date: Aug 21 – Jan 12

Prerequisites: None


Students will learn about various forms and philosophies of government using materials written by John Locke, William Blackstone, Montesquieu, and other political writings. Students will enjoy a close study of the US Constitution and its leading ideas and themes all according to original intent. Students will come away from this class with a love for great American Government and for the principles of truth found therein through weekly readings, document annotations, and weekly essays. In addition to being able to discuss their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics through written compositions (essays), memorizations, document study and analysis, speeches, and exams.

Students will also study economics by way of the seven principles of economics and the leading ideas of sound economy, Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations, economic worldviews based on Secular Humanism, Marxist/Leninism, and Biblical Christianity. They will learn basic economic terms and explore their usage. Students till also read, discuss, analyze and write about important essays on economics.

Math 7

Middle School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Aprel Mendenhall
     Dates: Aug 21 – Jan 12, Jan 15-May 16
    

Prerequisites: None


This course follows the Math 8/7 Saxon book. Students should plan to complete one math lesson each weekday, one test per week, and end-of-term exams.

Pre-Algebra

Middle or High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Aprel Mendenhall
     Dates: Aug 21 – Jan 12, Jan 15-May 16

Prerequisites: Math 7 or equivalent


This course follows the Algebra 1/2 Saxon book. Students should plan to complete one math lesson each weekday, one test per week, and end-of-term exams.

Algebra 1

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra or equivalent


This course follows the Algebra 1 Saxon book, which includes integrated Geometry instruction. Students should plan to complete one math lesson each weekday, one test per week, and end-of-term exams.

Algebra 2

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Prerequisites: Algebra 1 (Saxon) or equivalent Algebra + Geometry


This course follows the Algebra 2 Saxon book, including integrated Geometry instruction. Students should plan to complete one math lesson each weekday, one test per week, and end-of-term exams.

Honors Euclidian Geometry-

(Currently Not Available)

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Prerequisites: Algebra 1


In Honors Euclidian Geometry students will learn how to reason in a logical, disciplined way through the study of classical mathematics. Students will read the first four books of Euclid’s The Elements of Geometry, Archimedes’s On the Measurement of the Circle, and Abbott’s Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions. Students will demonstrate their learning and reasoning by recreating proofs, solving new problems, presenting their proofs, and constructively critiquing their own work. In an era when arguments are driven by emotions and memes—and when logical reasoning has been forgotten—this course is extremely necessary, useful, and fun.

Biology

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Lisa Allphin
     Dates: Aug 21 – Jan 12, Jan 15-May 16

Prerequisites: None


The theme for this course comes from Moses 2:26 in which gives us purpose and perspective for studying the creations of our Heavenly Father. In this scripture, we are given the specific instruction to have “dominion over the fishes of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and overall the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.” We have a great responsibility, and in order to fulfill that responsibility, we must be willing to understand the way in which life works. This course orients students to make informed and wise decisions regarding the impacts—both environmental impacts and social impacts—of modern biological science and related policy issues.

This course uses the textbook Concepts of Biology,  and open education resource from OpenStax. Students can access it online, download a free PDF, or order a print copy for $29.

The course price includes a $49.00 fee for the lab simulation software.

Chemistry

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Mentor Available
     Dates: Aug 21 – Jan 12, Jan 15-May 16

Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra


In this course, students will learn about the elements, interactions of the elements, chemical equations, and properties of chemical reactions. They will engage in lectures, hands-on experiments and labs, assessments, and student-created reports and projects. Students will explore certain key thematic questions. What models can help us understand the composition, properties, and interactions of matter? How can scientific skills and principles improve our lives? Besides discussions on their learning, students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics by creating a student notebook, an experiment lab book, and word studies.

Physics

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Mentor Available
Mentor:
Christopher Bross
     Dates: Aug 21 – Jan 12, Jan 15-May 16

Prerequisites: Algebra 1

In High School physics, students will be learning a wide range of concepts in a practical, conceptual, hands-on way. We will be studying topics such as classical mechanics, states of matter, heat transfer, electromagnetism, light, and relativity. As we look at the physical wonders of the world around us, we will acknowledge the hand of God in all things and learn to better live by the principles of the gospel. Each Term concludes with a hands-on project.

Competence with basic algebra is needed for success in this Physics course.

This course uses the textbook Physics,  an open education resource from OpenStax. Students can access it online, download a free PDF, or order a print copy for $29.

The course price includes a $49.00 fee for the lab simulation software.

Financial Literacy

High School

0.5 Credits

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Raine Gardner
     Dates: Aug 21 – Jan 12

Prerequisites: None


In this course, students will learn to be wise stewards of the material blessings the Lord provides by gaining a solid understanding of financial principles and learning to apply them to a gospel-centered life. Course material and content include best practices for sound financial management and counsel of the prophets, apostles, and other church leaders. The primary method of instruction will be through reading materials. Specific topics include, but are not limited to, budgeting, goal setting, cash management, credit, loans, debt, and much more. Students will demonstrate their understanding through the 4-Rs (research, reason, relate, and record) methodology through realistic assignments, short papers, quizzes, and a final exam. For many students, the most challenging part of the class is to create and apply a realistic budget. The principles learned in this course can be of value every day of their lives as they understand how to apply sound financial principles.

Business Technology

High School

0.5 Credits

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Raine Gardner
     Dates: Jan 15 – May 16

Prerequisites: None


In this course, students will learn computer technology skills and their application from a gospel-centered perspective. These skills include efficient retrieval of information from Internet resources;, mastery of personal productivity and communication tools, and content evaluation for quality and gospel harmony. Skills will be developed using the Internet, Microsoft Office software (Word, Excel, and PowerPoint), Google Docs, operating system file management, and email. The primary methods of instruction will include research, in-depth functionality training, and tutorials. Students will be given opportunities to relate and apply their acquired skills in course assignments and projects. Students will make application of these skills throughout their life in continued education, work, and Church service.

Principles of Leadership

High School

0.5 Credits

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Ame Burton
     Dates: Aug 21 – Jan 12

Prerequisites: None


The central theme of the Principles of Leadership course is “Inside-Out Leadership,” as it relates to the power of living and leading from the inside (internally and privately) to the outside (externally and publicly).

The primary text is The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen R. Covey. Units of study also include advocacy, negotiation, and avoiding and overcoming addictive behaviors. Various biographies of male and female leaders from different disciplines will be introduced and studied during the course. In addition, students participate in simulations, service, and field learning activities to apply leadership principles and learn from mentor leaders in the community.

Health

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Prerequisites: None


With an emphasis on application, this course is designed to empower you with the skills and understanding to choose and enjoy wellness. You will learn the “what” about health topics like sugar, anxiety, and cardiovascular fitness, but more importantly, you will uncover “why” the information matters to you, personally, and “how” to use it to navigate your life. Faith, fitness, food, and fortitude are explored with recurring themes of resilience, relationships, and personal power. (Reproductive health resources are provided for parents and are not taught in this course.)

Family Science

High School

Part A (0.5 Credits)
Part B (0.5 Credits)

Mentor Available
     Mentor: Iliana Wilkinson
     Dates: Aug 21 – Jan 12, Jan 15 – May 16

Prerequisites: None


In Family Science, students will explore thematic questions such as:

  • What factors contribute to enduring, happy marriages and families?
  • What small and simple things can families do that will make a big difference in family happiness?
  • What do Christian teachings, social science, and case studies reveal about successful children, parents, and family relationships?
  • What life lessons can students apply in their lives now and in the future?

The principles from The Family, A Proclamation to the World are the foundation for this class. We will come to understand from a biological, social, family law, and eternal perspective, why the natural family, with marriage between a man and woman at its core, is the fundamental unit of society. Various principles of healthy and productive family relationships will be taught. Students will use the 4-R methodology (research, reason, relate and record) to apply these principles in their own lives. Each student will learn skills and principles which will enable them to be Christ-centered children, siblings, and eventual husbands, wives, mothers, and fathers. Topics to be studied include: Communication skills, conflict management, personal financial management, dating standards and skills, college and career planning, gender roles and responsibilities, and general human development stages. All lesson plans, including those dealing with human sexuality, gender roles, and human development stages, are available to parents.

Experiential Learning

High School (Graduation Seeking Students Only)

0.5 Credits
Can be taken multiple times for additional credit

Prerequisites: None


In this course, students choose their own learning experience and adventure. This course can be taken multiple times, choosing different learning experiences. For example, if the family is making a trip, the student and the learning coach prepare a list of experiences to do during the trip and how to demonstrate learning. Or students can choose from a variety of learning experiences they can perform right from home. Student may use a work experience, or a career exploration for this credit as well.

Artistic Performance

High School (Graduation Seeking Students Only)

0.5 Credits
Can be taken multiple times for additional credit

Prerequisites: None


This course is designed for students who want to start or are already learning an artistic discipline. Students plan and receive pre-approval on how to actively participate and progress in their chosen art. Options: a musical instrument, voice, choral performance, ballet, drawing, painting, graphic design, sculpting, and so on.

Athletic Performance

High School (Graduation Seeking Students Only)

0.5 Credits
Can be taken multiple times for additional credit

Prerequisites: None


In this course, students will learn teamwork, sportsmanship, honesty, tolerance, flexibility, attitude, cooperation, self-discipline, and determination through a variety of sports and games of their choice. Students will demonstrate their understanding of these topics by planning and receiving pre-approval for how they are going to actively participate in their chosen sport (such as ultimate Frisbee, soccer, flag football, basketball, baseball, table tennis, frisbee golf, golf, swimming, gymnastics, etc.); game (such as four-square, dodgeball, kickball, capture the flag, chess, etc.); or activity (such as running, jogging, walking, swimming, hiking, yoga, etc.).

Share via
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap